Top-selling shoe – Yeezys http://yeezys.org/ Mon, 18 Oct 2021 03:30:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://yeezys.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-2021-10-14T150347.692-120x120.png Top-selling shoe – Yeezys http://yeezys.org/ 32 32 Get Payday Loans Texas Online https://yeezys.org/get-payday-loans-texas-online/ Mon, 18 Oct 2021 03:30:05 +0000 https://yeezys.org/?p=500 Texas is known for its luxurious lifestyle. This lifestyle can be associated with either a short-term cash crunch or long-term bankruptcy. Although bankruptcy can be a more difficult problem, short-term cash crunch can now be easily addressed with the ease of access to online payday loans Texas. Let’s start by explaining what a payday loan is. Payday loans […]]]>

Texas is known for its luxurious lifestyle. This lifestyle can be associated with either a short-term cash crunch or long-term bankruptcy. Although bankruptcy can be a more difficult problem, short-term cash crunch can now be easily addressed with the ease of access to online payday loans Texas. Let’s start by explaining what a payday loan is.

Payday loans are short-term loans that can be used to meet a financial emergency or for short-term financial needs. People with poor credit histories and a history of defaulting on their payments are most likely to be eligible for these loans. These loans have a very high interest rate (much higher that long-term bank loans), which covers the greater risk.

As well as banks, small businesses and companies can offer payday loans. Online payday loans Texas are the most common form of lending.

Online Payday Loans In Texas: Why bother?

Online payday loans are more convenient than applying at a bank branch or payday loan office. Online Payday loans Texas offer convenience and are easier to apply for. GreenDayOnline Texas loans are easier to obtain than small financial institutions. They have stricter policies regarding disbursement of payday loans and have to follow more guidelines. Online companies aren’t bound by such guidelines and are therefore more flexible. Online payday loans are much more accessible than offline, especially to those with poor credit scores.

Texas Regulations

Online payday loans Texas are gaining popularity due to the ease-of-use and relaxed rules of the industry. Payday loans are available in Texas without a cap on how much money a borrower can borrow. There is also no limit on how much a company can charge a borrower. Payday loans in Texas can have an annual interest rate of up to 600 percent.

These regulations are applicable to both offline and online payday loan lenders. Only two requirements apply to lenders: they must have a valid license, and they must clearly state all information about the loan, such as the interest rate, upfront fees, tenure, and other terms and conditions. These information must be provided before any documentation is completed for loans. This will ensure that the borrower is fully aware of the risks and costs involved in taking out such a large loan.

Is It Worth The Effort?

According to Texas law, online payday loans Texas can’t be repaid without being paid back. This may sound great for people with a history of defaulting on payments but it should not be taken as an incentive to get a payday loan. Payday loans are a great option for situations like a medical emergency. However, the associated costs can be very high. Payday loans can only increase your expenses, and you won’t get any real benefits in the long-term.

Although Texas regulations prohibit companies from rolling over existing loans for a longer time period in the event of default in payments, it has been noticed that many borrowers take multiple payday loans from different companies in order to repay an existing loan. This can lead to financial ruin and make it difficult for borrowers to get out of the vicious circle.

It is better to manage your finances well than rely on payday loans in an emergency. To build up an emergency fund, people should look into part-time work to earn extra income. Payday loans should only be used as a last resort for a healthy lifestyle and financial planning.

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How many missed? Texas is second-worst in the nation for COVID-19 testing https://yeezys.org/how-many-missed-texas-is-second-worst-in-the-nation-for-covid-19-testing/ Thu, 14 Oct 2021 15:29:59 +0000 https://yeezys.org/?p=453 Six times in three weeks, Marci Rosenberg and her ailing husband and teenage children tried to get tested for the new coronavirus — only to be turned away each time, either for not meeting narrow testing criteria or because there simply were not enough tests available. All the while, the Bellaire family of four grew […]]]>


Six times in three weeks, Marci Rosenberg and her ailing husband and teenage children tried to get tested for the new coronavirus — only to be turned away each time, either for not meeting narrow testing criteria or because there simply were not enough tests available.

All the while, the Bellaire family of four grew sicker as their fevers spiked and their coughs worsened. They said they fell one by one into an exhaustion unlike any they had felt before.

By March 18, Rosenberg was desperate and pleaded with her doctor for a test. Dr. Lisa Ehrlich, an internal medicine physician, told Rosenberg to pull into her office driveway. But Ehrlich warned Rosenberg, “I can only test one of you.” She swabbed her throat through an open car window. The result came back the next day: positive.

PANDEMIC EXPERT:  Coronavirus will have 5 stages. We’re in stage 2 in Houston.

The rest of her family was presumed to be positive but untested – and thus excluded from any official tally of the disease.

As the number of confirmed cases of the potentially deadly virus continues to explode across the Houston region – tripling from 1,000 to more than 3,000 in just the past week – there is mounting evidence that the true scope of the disease here could be far worse than the numbers indicate.

A Houston Chronicle analysis of testing data collected through Wednesday shows that Texas has the second-worst rate of testing per capita in the nation, with only 332 tests conducted for every 100,000 people. Only Kansas ranks lower, at 327 per 100,000 people.

In cities across Texas — from Houston to Dallas, San Antonio to Nacogdoches — testing continues to be fraught with missteps, delays and shortages, resulting in what many predict will ultimately be a significant undercount. Not fully knowing who has or had the disease both skews public health data and also hampers treatment and prevention strategies, potentially leading to a higher death count, health care experts say.

In Houston, the nation’s fourth-largest city, officials worry that because the number of confirmed cases is lower than other major U.S. cities, the situation here may seem less serious. The federal government announced plans to cut 25 percent of its funding to help administer the city’s two testing sites and relocate six federal public health workers who help manage the sites.

Dr. David Persse, Health Authority for the Houston Health Department, protested the decision as a “monumental step backwards,” in a letter this week to Erica Schwartz, deputy U.S. surgeon general. On Thursday, the federal government agreed to extend funding for both the city and county testing sites through May 30.

The total testing volume for all four Houston-area sites, two run by city and two run by the county, has been capped at 1,000 people per day until Saturday, when federal officials pledged to double that capacity.

“Without robust testing we have no idea of our true numbers,” Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner has said. “You can look at the numbers we have (of confirmed cases) and multiply them by 10.”

Slow to start

As the pandemic’s march quickened, Texas was slow to ramp up testing.

The first confirmed case in Texas, outside those under federal quarantine from a cruise ship, was March 4, striking a Houston area man in his 70s who lived in Fort Bend county and had recently traveled abroad. By month’s end, the Houston area had more than 1,000 confirmed cases. A week later, the number had pushed past 3,000.

Yet it was not until March 30 that the rate of testing per 100,000 people in Texas topped 100. As of Wednesday, the state was testing 327 per 100,000, according to a Chronicle analysis of data from The COVID Tracking Project, which collects information nationwide on testing primarily from state health departments, and supplements with reliable news reports and live press conferences.

Twenty-six states in the U.S. are testing at least double the number of patients per capita as Texas, in some cases six times more. New York, for instance, is testing 1,877 per 100,000 people while neighboring Louisiana is testing 1,622 per 100,000. Even smaller states, such as New Mexico, are testing triple the rate of Texas.

Texas officials defended the state’s response.

“We’ve consistently seen about 10 percent of tests coming back positive, which indicates there is enough testing for public health surveillance,” said Chris Van Deusen, a spokesman for the Department of State Health Services, in an email, “If we saw 40 or 50 percent or more of test coming back positive, we’d be concerned that there could be a large number of cases out there going unreported, but that has not been the case.”

It is unclear if that is a reliable measure. Nearly 41 percent of New York tests were positive, the second-highest rate in the country. In Texas, about 9.4 percent of tests were positive — roughly the same as Washington state, where one of the largest outbreaks of coronavirus has occurred.

At a news conference this week, Gov. Greg Abbott downplayed any problems with testing. “The bottom line is whatever the source may be, we are seeing more testing achieved in the state of Texas,” he said.

The stakes for better testing could not be higher. Without widespread testing, experts said, it is impossible to fully quantify how many people have the disease and to identify hotspots. Public health officials have said they need to establish a large enough baseline to see patterns, deploy resources and ultimately calculate mortality rates.

As of Saturday, the number of confirmed cases nationwide had grown to more than 526,00 with more than 20,000 deaths. The number of deaths in Texas was 271.

Rural trouble to come?

In early March, when the national number of confirmed cases was just reaching triple digits, University of Texas researchers in Austin began examining the virus’ potential spread using models originally developed when the Zika virus swept the world in 2016.

In both instances, testing capacity was low and many who were infected never showed symptoms, which led to underestimates of the diseases’ true toll, said Spencer Fox, a research associate and data scientist at the university.

“We found that even if a county has only one or two cases,” said Fox, whose research is currently under peer review, “those cases likely signal that there is a growing epidemic in the county even if they don’t detect it.”

That could spell trouble for the state’s small towns and rural areas, where even a single reported case means that the virus could already be spreading.

On March 13, President Donald Trump declared the outbreak a national emergency and announced a government partnership with the medical lab industry to greatly expand testing. It was to be a rescue mission of sorts, tapping the infrastructure and expertise of the private sector to streamline the process and stave off critics who complained not nearly enough people were being tested.

A week later, Houston followed other cities around the country and opened its first drive-thru testing site at Butler Stadium, reserved initially for first responders and health care workers with a promise to expand to others who were showing symptoms or considered high risk.

A second city site was opened recently, bringing the total in the area to four, including two Harris County sites. The total testing volume for all four was originally capped at 1,000 people per day. Meanwhile, hospitals, clinics and doctors’ offices forged their own agreements with private labs or created their own tests.

Almost immediately, demand outstripped resources at every step of the process. Lines at testing sites snaked for miles, testing supplies and the tests themselves grew scarce as did the protective gear needed to safely administer them. The wait for results went from a few days to up to two weeks. Meanwhile, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidance has continued to shift, leading to even more confusion and delays.

Quest Diagnostics, one of the two major commercial labs that won a government testing contract, said in late March it had a backlog of 160,000 tests as its labs were overwhelmed. Since then the company has said its backlog has been cut in half.

LabCorp, the other major lab, said in an emailed statement Saturday it “continues to do everything it can to ensure that healthcare providers and patients receive their test results as quickly as possible.” The company acknowledged that in the early days some results took longer than anticipated but more recently the turnaround after picking up a specimen is usually two to four days.

Other players are now entering the marketplace, with a spate of new rapid-return testing options soon to be available that come with promises to boost the number of tests given and processed. But roll out remains spotty and a timeline unclear.

At Legacy Community Health, a network of clinics that serve Houston’s poor and uninsured, the number of people being tested has shrunk dramatically. When testing began there March 16, as many as 160 people per day across 15 clinics could be tested. Today, at best, only 30 a day are tested, said Dr. Vian Nguyen, chief medical officer at Legacy.

When testing launched, anyone with symptoms plus exposure to someone with the virus or who traveled could get a test at Legacy, she said. But as the system bogged down and supplies became tight, testing criteria became limited to health care workers and first responders, followed by high-risk patients who were exhibiting symptoms – leaving countless people, many who were also sick, shut out.

“It is clear that supply chain issues are driving our testing criteria and access to testing sites, rather than the need for clinical assessment and data collection,” said Nguyen, adding that the criteria could broaden as more supplies become available.

She and others say a more realistic option, especially amid talk of reopening businesses, is a pivot toward antibody testing to detect if a person has developed a resistance to the virus. While unknown if once infected a person can get covid-19 again, the presumption is they would be at least partly protected.

“As a doctor I have no idea where to tell my patients to go to get tested,” said Dr. Marrie Richards, a Houston family practitioner.

One of her patients, a restaurant worker in his 40s who was clearly sick, went to a testing site in Katy on March 31 and waited in his car six hours. The location closed before he reached the front of the line. Richards said he returned the next day, arriving an hour before it opened, and waited two more hours before finally being tested. His results came back positive.

Richards scoffs at the idea that most people who are ill will wait nine hours for testing. They will just never know, she says. Nor will they be counted.

Two negatives, one positive

Back before things got really bad, before the city shut down, Courtney Scobie got her hair cut.

The 42-year-old wrestled mightily with whether to keep her appointment on March 18. The rodeo had been cancelled and schools had just been closed, but like many in Houston at the time, she was not sure of her risk. She decided to proceed with caution: the salon would be mostly empty, her hairdresser had sanitized his station thoroughly, and they skipped their usual hug.

Four days later, on Sunday, March 22, she got a text from him asking to call immediately. She knew. And started to cry.

Her hairdresser, who during their appointment had no idea he was infected, had just tested positive. He thinks he picked up the virus from a client before Scobie, who was also asymptomatic at the time but was later hospitalized.

Mostly she was mad at herself. “Why did I have to go do that?” she thought, “I felt really dumb. I felt really guilty that I could expose my family.” Later that night her fever kicked in.

She called several doctors who told her she was ineligible for testing because she did not have an underlying health issue. She was to quarantine and assume she had the virus. On March 25, her husband found a physician who tested her for $60 for the office visit plus $125 for the test. The next day she learned she tested positive.

Forty-eight hours later, her husband, Bruce Scobie, who has a history of asthma, began coughing. On March 28, he was tested at an urgent care clinic. The next day he was in the emergency room with shortness of breath but released. A few days later his test came back negative.

Scobie’s husband has since been tested twice more by the same physician who tested Scobie. The doctor’s idea was to try to compare results because so many did not make sense. Out of his three tests, two were negative, one positive.

Public health experts now warn that the typical swab tests can have up to a 30 percent false negative rate, depending on how they are administered.

Tuesday morning, just after 4:30 a.m., Bruce Scobie could not breathe. He was taken by ambulance to Memorial Hermann Southwest and admitted. Doctors suspect pneumonia linked to COVID-19.

Nowhere in the numbers

Marci Rosenberg has no idea how her family became exposed to the virus. The best guess is it happened sometime in February when she and her 15-year-old daughter, Mimi, went to New York City. The teenager was the first to get sick, diagnosed with a bronchial infection and given antibiotics which did not fully work. She seemed to get better briefly but then fell ill again.

The first time Rosenberg asked for a test for Mimi was in late February, back when the virus had landed hard in other parts of the world but had yet to find a foothold in the U.S. “They looked at me like I was crazy,” she said. The first confirmed case in New York was March 1. The incubation period for the virus can be up to 14 days.

In the coming weeks there would be five more attempts for either Mimi, herself, or for her husband, Ben Samuels. The couple’s son, Ethan, also soon became ill. There is little doubt, Rosenberg’s doctor said, that they all have covid-19 although only one was tested.

“It’s certain that me, my daughter and my son are nowhere in the numbers,” said Samuels, “And we’re not certain Marci is either.”

After her positive result the couple scoured reports of confirmed cases, which only listed basic demographic information. Rosenberg is 52. In the immediate time surrounding her test, there was only one woman in the 50 to 59 age range but unlike Rosenberg that woman was listed as hospitalized.

Further, the couple was told a public health official would call to begin the process known as contact tracing to track down those who they might have infected. To this day no one has called them, they said. So, instead they began their own backtracking, warning roughly 30 people they may have exposed.

In a seven-block radius at least eight people the family had contact with are now or have been sick recently. Only one was tested, which came back negative. So none will show up in the city’s count.

“Of course there is an undercount,” said Samuels, who added his family is now slowly on the mend. “The numbers you hear are totally useless.”

Staff writer John Tedesco contributed.

jenny.deam@chron.com

twitter.com/jenny_deam

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Kevin Smith’s Mooby arrives at Red Bank https://yeezys.org/kevin-smiths-mooby-arrives-at-red-bank/ Fri, 03 Sep 2021 10:44:30 +0000 https://yeezys.org/kevin-smiths-mooby-arrives-at-red-bank/ Mooby’s, the fictional fast-food restaurant from Kevin Smith’s film universe, will have a stationary appearance at Red Bank in September. The pop-up restaurant, according to Patch.com, is open on the grounds of Gianni’s Pizza from September 8th to 18th. Mooby’s is open daily from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Reservations are required and can be […]]]>


Mooby’s, the fictional fast-food restaurant from Kevin Smith’s film universe, will have a stationary appearance at Red Bank in September.

The pop-up restaurant, according to Patch.com, is open on the grounds of Gianni’s Pizza from September 8th to 18th. Mooby’s is open daily from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Reservations are required and can be made here; Tickets will be available from next week. You can sign up to receive an email notification to purchase early tickets.

According to an Instagram post, Smith will be there when the restaurant opens: I come home to be there when Mooby’s doors open wide (and maybe do a show or two)!

Mooby’s has been featured in several of Smith’s films; Clerks II was almost entirely housed in the restaurant. Dante and Randall both work at Mooby’s, although they are both unhappy there and the film ends with them choosing to leave Mooby’s; You want to buy the Quick Stop where the original Clerks was hired.

Clerks III shot in Leonardo and Mooby’s popup is in honor of the film. The plot of the film is according to IMDB.com Dante, Elias, Jay and Silent Bob are hired by Randal after a heart attack to make a movie about the supermarket that started it all. The film combines characters from the first two Clerks films with the actors Rosario Dawson, Jason Mewes, Brian O’Halloran, Jeff Anderson and of course Smith as Silent Bob, who all repeat their roles.

It is not yet known whether there will be a donkey show. Smoochie boochies!

The above post reflects the thoughts and observations of talk show host Bill Doyle of New Jersey 101.5. All opinions expressed are those of Bill Doyle.

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FTC cannot receive monetary relief under FTC Section 13b https://yeezys.org/ftc-cannot-receive-monetary-relief-under-ftc-section-13b/ Fri, 03 Sep 2021 10:44:30 +0000 https://yeezys.org/ftc-cannot-receive-monetary-relief-under-ftc-section-13b/ The Supreme Court unanimously ruled that Section 13 (b) of the Federal Trade Commission Act does not give the Commission the power to evade administrative procedures and seek fair monetary relief directly in the federal courts. Section 13 (b) of the FTC Act provides that if the Commission “has reason to believe that any person, […]]]>


The Supreme Court unanimously ruled that Section 13 (b) of the Federal Trade Commission Act does not give the Commission the power to evade administrative procedures and seek fair monetary relief directly in the federal courts.

Section 13 (b) of the FTC Act provides that if the Commission “has reason to believe that any person, partnership, or corporation is violating, or about to violate, any law enforced by the Federal Trade Commission. . . in appropriate cases, the commission may seek an injunction and, upon proper evidence, the court may issue an injunction. ”For over four decades, the Commission has relied on this section to bring consumer and antitrust lawsuits directly to federal courts for interim relief Obtaining rulings and financial relief, such as reimbursement and levy, and brings “far more cases to court than through the administrative process”. And along the way, the Commission has received billions of dollars in discharge and has secured $ 11.2 billion in consumer refunds in the last five years alone.

In 2012, the commission filed a complaint in federal court against Scott Tucker and his companies, citing Section 13 (b), alleging that their short-term lending practices were deceptive and unfair and in violation of Section 5 (a) of the FTC Act. In a summary judgment, the District Court upheld the FTC’s motion for an injunction and financial appeal, ordering Tucker to pay $ 1.27 billion in refunds and levies to be used by the commission to “direct.” Consumer remedies “to provide. On appeal before the Ninth Ward, Tucker alleged that Section 13 (b) did not give the commission the power to seek the county court’s pecuniary relief. Following its precedent, the Ninth District stated that Section 13 (b) “empowers the district courts to provide any additional remedies necessary to achieve full justice, including redress.” The Supreme Court granted Tucker’s request for certiorari to address the recent split in the circuit regarding the “scope of section 13 (b)”.

As discussed here , During the oral argument, Tucker argued that because Section 5 (l) expressly empowers the Commission to seek “injunctions and other appropriate remedies” in the district courts against defendants who violate an administrative judge’s final injunction, and this provision has been changed Concurrently with the passage of Section 13 (b), Congress deliberately limited the Commission’s powers under Section 13 (b) to “permanent injunctions” only. On the other hand, the commission argued that the textual discrepancies reflected the functional differences between enforcing a lawsuit first through the administrative process or bringing it directly to the federal courts, and that Congress left the commission to choose by adopting Section 13 (b) , Enforcement options.

The Supreme Court eventually overturned the Ninth Ward ruling, concluding that Section 13 (b) “does not give the Commission any power to obtain fair monetary relief”.

In particular, the court found that Section 13 (b) not only refers to the ability to seek “injunctions” but, when looking at the rule as a whole, including its grammatical structure – “violated” and “about to violate” – 13 (b) “focuses on prospective and non-retrospective relief.” In addition, the court examined the structure of the law and the other provisions that expressly authorize the Commission to seek monetary relief in federal courts only after going through the administrative process and obtaining an injunction . This includes Section 5 (l), which authorizes the district courts to “provide other and other reasonable remedies as they deem appropriate,” and Section 19, which “permits such remedies as the court deems necessary to resolve the issue To repair consumer damage ”. On the basis of these provisions, the Court found it “very unlikely” that 13 (b) would enable the Commission “to obtain the same financial relief and more” without first meeting the conditions and restrictions for carrying out the administrative procedure under the Requirements to have to meet Sections 5 (l) and 19.

The Court concluded that the Commission’s competence gap created by its decision can be closed by a legal regulation. Following the decision, Acting FTC Chairperson Rebecca Kelly Slaughter issued a statement calling on Congress to “act quickly and restore and empower the agency so we can heal unjustified consumers.” Until Congress acts, advertisers are likely to see more administrative proceedings with the FTC, as well as the Commission seeking alternative ways to claim funds that are no longer available under Section 13 (b). Chairwoman Slaughter reiterated during her inaugural statement on April 27, 2021 before the US House of Representatives Consumer Protection and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Commerce: “[A] A word on the other FTC agencies: we will use them all – administrative procedures, the penal authorities, more rule-breaking cases, more rule-making, more civil sanctions when we have special legal powers. But without action by Congress, none of these options will come as close to consumer protection and compliance incentives as our lost authority under 13 (b). I hope you will act quickly to restore it. ”To be continued, now in the halls of Congress.

The case is AMG Capital Management, LLC v Federal Trade Commission, File No. 19-508, 593 US__ (April 22, 2021).

© 2021 Finnegan, Henderson, Farabow, Garrett & Dunner, LLPNational Law Review, Volume XI, Number 134



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FTC Act Section 13b for Just Money Relief https://yeezys.org/ftc-act-section-13b-for-just-money-relief/ Fri, 03 Sep 2021 10:44:30 +0000 https://yeezys.org/ftc-act-section-13b-for-just-money-relief/ In AMG Capital Management versus FTC, the Supreme Court unanimously ruled that Section 13 (b) of the FTC Act does not allow the FTC to seek fair monetary relief on lawsuits in federal courts. 141 S.Kt. 1341 (2021). However, the FTC may still seek financial relief under other sections of the law. In AMG Capital […]]]>


In AMG Capital Management versus FTC, the Supreme Court unanimously ruled that Section 13 (b) of the FTC Act does not allow the FTC to seek fair monetary relief on lawsuits in federal courts. 141 S.Kt. 1341 (2021). However, the FTC may still seek financial relief under other sections of the law.

In AMG Capital Management versus FTC, the petitioner AMG Capital Management (AMG) offered short-term payday loans to borrowers. In marketing these loans, it misled customers by suggesting that they only had to make a single payment for a loan. This was misleading because customers who did not choose to automatically renew such payments would continue to be billed the original payment amount for their loans. As a result of these fraudulent practices, AMG has accrued more than $ 1.3 billion in fraudulent charges.

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has filed a lawsuit against AMG in federal court under Section 5 (a) of the Federal Trade Commission Act (the Act) (see 15 USC Section 45 (a) (1)). Citing Section 13 (b), the FTC filed for an injunction and requested that the court order monetary compensation in the form of the refund and siphon off of AMG’s ill-gotten gains. The district court granted the FTC’s request for financial relief. AMG appealed, arguing that Section 13 (b) does not empower courts to grant cash relief or to grant the FTC. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth District upheld the District Court’s decision and relied on precedents to support the interpretation of Section 13 (b) as empowering courts to empower the FTC. AMG applied for Certiorari and was granted by the US Supreme Court.

The court reversed, ruling that Section 13 (b) does not authorize the FTC to seek financial relief from companies involved in fraudulent trading practices. In a unanimous statement, the court agreed that Section 13 (b) cannot be construed as authorizing fair monetary relief, such as the refund and siphoning off of profits, that the FTC has requested here. Instead, the court interpreted the wording of Section 13 (b) to have its clear meaning – that courts of the FTC can only issue an injunction in a civil action where appropriate.

When the FTC was founded, it was only authorized to take enforcement measures in administrative proceedings. Decades later, Congress passed Section 13 (b) of the FTC Act, which allowed the FTC to bring enforcement action in federal court and seek temporary and permanent injunctive relief. What followed was a series of decisions interpreting the newly added section so that federal courts ruling FTC lawsuits were not limited to providing just relief in the form of injunctions, but rather were using the full range of their just powers were able to get other types of equitable relief, such as refunds and skimming of profits. In its ruling, the Supreme Court dismissed this precedent, stating that the remedy available in Section 13 (b) in conjunction with other sections of the Act was intended to be an exclusive list of options that only concerned “prospective injunctions”. and not “subsequent monetary relief”.

While the decision allows the FTC to apply for Section 13 (b) financial relief, it did not result in a blanket ban on the FTC from seeking any form of financial relief. As part of its analysis, the Court recognized that other provisions of the law expressly empower the FTC to request certain forms of monetary relief. For example, under Section 19 of the Act, the FTC can continue to seek monetary relief, which allows federal courts to issue “redress”[ing] Consumer Injury ”such as a“ Money Refund ”, but only after the FTC has initiated administrative proceedings, obtained a cease and desist order in such proceeding, and petitioned federal court to enforce that order under Section 19 (d).



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Johnson & Johnson Settles New York Opioid Case for $ 230 Million https://yeezys.org/johnson-johnson-settles-new-york-opioid-case-for-230-million/ Fri, 03 Sep 2021 10:44:30 +0000 https://yeezys.org/johnson-johnson-settles-new-york-opioid-case-for-230-million/ Johnson & Johnson has agreed to pay $ 230 million to New York State to settle an opioid lawsuit due to go on trial Tuesday as negotiations with the company and three drug distributors intensify to reach a decision $ 26 billion comparison of thousands of other lawsuits blaming the pharmaceutical industry for the opioid […]]]>


Johnson & Johnson

has agreed to pay $ 230 million to New York State to settle an opioid lawsuit due to go on trial Tuesday as negotiations with the company and three drug distributors intensify to reach a decision $ 26 billion comparison of thousands of other lawsuits blaming the pharmaceutical industry for the opioid crisis.

Johnson & Johnson’s New York deal removes it from an upcoming trial in Long Island, but not from the rest of the cases it faces nationwide, including an ongoing trial in California. The New York settlement includes an additional $ 33 million in legal fees and expenses and calls on the drug maker to stop selling opioids nationwide, as Johnson & Johnson said it would.

The states have tried to use the opioid trials to reconstruct what they achieved with tobacco companies in the 1990s, when settlements totaling 206 billion US dollars flowed into the treasury. More than 3,000 counties, cities and other local governments have also filed lawsuits over the opioid crisis. complicated conversations that dragged on since the end of 2019 and which were slowed down by the Covid 19 pandemic.

Johnson & Johnson, along with the largest drug distributors in the country,

AmerisourceBergen Corp.

,

Cardinal health Inc.

and

McKesson Corp.

, in talks with attorneys general and plaintiffs attorneys for local governments to resolve the $ 26 billion cases.

The company said Saturday that there is continued progress on the statewide agreement and that it “remains committed to providing reassurance and critical assistance to communities in need”.

In the last few weeks the broader settlement discussions have picked up speed when the exams began in California and West Virginia, according to attorneys involved.

Company representatives, including drug maker Johnson & Johnson, are involved in opioid settlement talks.


Photo:

Mark Kauzlarich / Bloomberg News

The New York Trial, which will be the first nationwide to be heard by a jury and the first to involve companies across the opioid supply chain, has made the negotiations more urgent. The testimony continues Monday in the California trial launched by multiple counties against four drug manufacturers and West Virginia trial against drug dealers.

A core team of attorneys general has held regular telephone settlement conferences and “conducted face-to-face negotiations in New York almost every day for the past few weeks,” according to a mid-June announcement in an opioid case in San Francisco.

The lawsuits and settlement meetings come after more than four years of litigation by states, cities, and counties for a portion of the cost of an opioid epidemic that has killed half a million people in the US since 1999.

The testimony will be resumed in the West Virginia Drug Dealer Trial.


Photo:

Kenny Kemp / Charleston Gazette-Mail / Associated Press

Governments claim that the pharmaceutical industry has pushed the prescription and distribution of opioids beyond what is medically necessary, leading to widespread addiction that has led to higher levels of abuse of illicit opioids such as heroin and fentanyl. The companies have largely denied the claims, stating that they were selling or distributing a legal, government-regulated product that is required for pain management.

Although expensive, a comparison would give companies and their investors some assurance about their future opioid liability. McKesson said it had a charge of $ 8.1 billion; AmerisourceBergen and Cardinal each have $ 6.6 billion; and $ 5 billion would come from Johnson & Johnson. New York’s share will be deducted from this amount, the company said.

The $ 230 million to New York will be paid out over nine years, but more than half could come as early as February if all sued local governments approve the deal and if the governor signs a new state bill that creates a special fund to help fund opioid Use settlements to contain the crisis.

Addiction experts largely agree on the most effective way to help opioid addicts: drug treatment. But most inpatient rehab facilities in the US don’t offer this option. Jason Bellini from the WSJ reports on why the medication option is controversial and difficult to come by in many places. Image: Ryno Eksteen and Thomas Williams (video from November 16, 2017)

The New York trial was originally scheduled for March 2020 but has been postponed due to the pandemic. Attorney General Letitia James will file claims alongside Suffolk and Nassau counties. With J & J’s settlement, the defendants include three other opioid manufacturers, several drug dealers, and the pharmacy

Walgreens Boots Alliance Inc.,

which was only sued by the counties. Three other large pharmacies—

Walmart Inc.,

rite

Aid Corp. and

CVS health Corp.

– were disconnected from the process during the jury selection, although the conditions for settlements were not disclosed.

In a statement, Ms. James said the state’s focus remains “getting money into opioid-ravaged communities as soon as possible.” Hunter Shkolnik, a district attorney, said that “judgment day is here” after several delays.

Walgreens said it only distributed opioids to its own pharmacies, not pain clinics, internet pharmacies, or “pill factories” which it says have fueled the crisis. AmerisourceBergen said the company has no control over the demand for drugs it sells and is following federally mandated quotas. The other companies declined to comment or did not respond to requests for comments.

The lawsuit, like the others on trial, alleges that the companies caused public harassment by flooding communities with opioids. The first phase of the New York process, which is expected to last four months, will alone determine whether the companies are liable. If a jury found this, a separate process would examine how much money they owe the state and counties.

The study differs from those that took place in Oklahoma, California and West Virginia in that it will involve actors from across the supply chain. That will make it harder for companies to blame others for the problem, said Elizabeth Burch, a law professor at the University of Georgia.

“What we’re seeing in the trials that are going on right now is it’s easy to point a finger at empty chairs,” she said.

the first opioid study, filed by the state of Oklahoma, resulted in a $ 465 million judgment against Johnson & Johnson, which the company is appealing. Another lawsuit in the case of two Ohio counties, ended in settlements shortly before the planned start in 2019.

Talks about a broad resolution of the opioid cases slowed down during the pandemic as procedures were delayed. Trial appointments often serve as a deadline for comparisons, as both sides can benefit from the security of a deal compared to the unpredictability, cost, and time involved in legal proceedings.

Once the structure of the deal is completed, there are still a few steps left until payday. State and local governments will have several months to register, according to the latest filing in the San Francisco case. Companies will also have an option to leave if not enough government agencies join the settlement, lawyers involved in the negotiations said.

Around $ 2 billion of the settlement is set to be used for legal fees, the lawyers said.

Write to Sara Randazzo at sara.randazzo@wsj.com

Copyright © 2021 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All rights reserved. 87990cbe856818d5eddac44c7b1cdeb8



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FDIC sees rise in unbanked households in the Miami area https://yeezys.org/fdic-sees-rise-in-unbanked-households-in-the-miami-area/ Fri, 03 Sep 2021 10:44:30 +0000 https://yeezys.org/fdic-sees-rise-in-unbanked-households-in-the-miami-area/ The percentage of households in South Florida without a bank account – the so-called without a bank account – rose in 2017, although the national percentage fell last year, a new government survey shows. A full 8 percent of households in the Miami, Fort Lauderdale, and West Palm Beach metropolitan area had no bank accounts, […]]]>


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The percentage of households in South Florida without a bank account – the so-called without a bank account – rose in 2017, although the national percentage fell last year, a new government survey shows.

A full 8 percent of households in the Miami, Fort Lauderdale, and West Palm Beach metropolitan area had no bank accounts, borrowed money, or cashed checks outside the banking system survey every two years was released Tuesday by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, a major banking regulator.

The survey is conducted every two years, and at the national level, the number of households without bank details fell to 6.5 percent, down from 7 percent in 2015 and 7.7 percent in 2013.

“The good news is that our country’s banking system serves more American households than ever before. The bad news is that despite the decline in the total number of unbanked people, 8.4 million households remain out of banking, ”FDIC Chair Jelena McWilliams said in a statement accompanying the report’s release.

The South Florida number moved in the opposite direction from the national average, with the 8 percent of unbanked households last year higher than the national 6 percent figure, even better than the national average.

As a sign that South Florida’s economy is improving, the percentage of households in the region classified as underserved was 17.6 percent, below the national average of 18.7 percent. An inadequate household household is one in which a family member has an account with an insured financial institution but has obtained financial services or loans outside of the banking system.

Households with poor banking connections are also marked as those who have left the banking system in the past 12 months to receive a money order, cash a check or send money abroad, take out a loan before a paycheck, against their car title, or from one Pawnshop, drawn or loaned for an expected tax refund.

Deep in Data tables, there was another positive sign. The use of these types of products in South Florida actually declined along with the underserved numbers. About 4.5 percent of South Florida borrowed alternative loan products from non-bank lenders in 2017, compared with 5.2 percent in 2015 but up from 3.5 percent in 2013.

That could change, say consumer advocates, due to a relatively new law in Florida that the types of high-interest loans expanded Payday lenders can especially do that Working poor and minorities.

“This legislative move increases the risk of Floridians being thrown out of the banking system because they are trapped in harmful payday loans,” said Diane Standaert, state policy director for the Center for Responsible Lending, a national advocacy group.

There were fewer households nationwide in 2017 compared to 2015, and the 17.6 percent rate in South Florida was a slight improvement from an 18 percent rate in 2015. Compared to the 13.9 percent rate in 2013 it still increased by a tick of 5.9 percent in 2015, but less than 6.2 percent in 2013.

The falling number of households with underserved households could explain why Non-bank lenders lobby Congress and the Trump administration to relax rules protecting members of the armed forces and the working poor from expensive loans. The Trump administration has announced it will ease enforcement of rules capping a 36 percent annual interest rate on non-bank loans to active duty members.

And a coalition of non-bank lenders led by payday groups has filed a federal lawsuit seeking Implementation thwart of rules that would require them to measure a borrower’s ability to repay an expensive loan.

Payday lenders have been pushing hard to relax rules that will make it easier to lure more people into debt,” Standaert said.

Kevin G. Hall: 202-383-6038, @KevinGHall

This story was originally published October 24, 2018 8:00 a.m.



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Judge orders Leawood’s brother payday loan mogul Scott Tucker to surrender https://yeezys.org/judge-orders-leawoods-brother-payday-loan-mogul-scott-tucker-to-surrender/ Fri, 03 Sep 2021 10:44:30 +0000 https://yeezys.org/judge-orders-leawoods-brother-payday-loan-mogul-scott-tucker-to-surrender/ Joel Tucker Johnson County Sheriff’s Office A federal bankruptcy judge in Texas has ordered Joel Tucker, a Kansas City businessman, to surrender to the US Marshals in Houston by July 29th. Marvin Isgur, a Houston bankruptcy judge, wrote in an order that Tucker failed to keep a record of the debts of payday loans that […]]]>


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Joel Tucker

A federal bankruptcy judge in Texas has ordered Joel Tucker, a Kansas City businessman, to surrender to the US Marshals in Houston by July 29th.

Marvin Isgur, a Houston bankruptcy judge, wrote in an order that Tucker failed to keep a record of the debts of payday loans that he allegedly sold to debt collection agencies. Collectors now believe the portfolios are fraudulent.

Tucker, who has residences in Colorado and Prairie Village, is the brother of Scott Tucker, a professional Leawood racing driver who was accused by a New York grand jury of conducting an illegal business with a $ 2 billion payday loan.

Joel Tucker once owned eData Solutions, a Kansas City company that generated leads and sold them to payday loan companies. He later sold eData Solutions to the Wyandotte Nation Tribe of Oklahoma for millions.

Tucker was the focus of bankruptcy proceedings in Texas earlier this year.

Houston judges identified a number of consumer bankruptcy cases in late 2015, with debtors questioning the validity of payday loan debts claimed by collection agencies.

Isgur demanded that three debt collection agencies – Atlas Acquisitions, Porania, and JH Portfolio Debt Equities – explain why their payday loan claims, often $ 390, were routinely contested in bankruptcy cases.

In court records last year, Porania said it paid a broker $ 72,538 for a portfolio of 15,000 payday loan debts worth $ 390 each. Collection agencies buy unpaid debts from creditors, often for pennies per dollar, and try to collect the full amount owed.

Collectors believe Porania’s portfolio was created by Joel Tucker.

Tucker was ordered to testify and produce records in Houston to prove the origin of the payday loan debt. So far, Tucker has not produced enough evidence to please the Texas judge. Isgur also admonished Tucker for making contradicting statements about the origin of his debts.

Isgur, who ordered Tucker’s handover to law enforcement, said Tucker “misdirected the court in useless ways” through a lawsuit.

Tucker and his Houston attorney, Jim Wetwiska, were not available for comment.

The debt collection agencies, now believing the debt portfolios they bought to be fraudulent, have withdrawn more than 1,000 of their claims from bankruptcy courts across the country.

This story was originally published July 22, 2016 3:52 pm.



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Watch Now: New Illinois State University President Starts With Plenty On Her Plate | Local education https://yeezys.org/watch-now-new-illinois-state-university-president-starts-with-plenty-on-her-plate-local-education/ Fri, 03 Sep 2021 10:44:30 +0000 https://yeezys.org/watch-now-new-illinois-state-university-president-starts-with-plenty-on-her-plate-local-education/ Terri Goss Kinzy was named 20th President of Illinois State University on May 14, 2021 and made history as the first ISU woman to fill this role. NORMAL – Terri Goss Kinzy assumed her role as the 20th President of Illinois State University Thursday, but there won’t be much of a honeymoon for them to […]]]>


Terri Goss Kinzy was named 20th President of Illinois State University on May 14, 2021 and made history as the first ISU woman to fill this role.



NORMAL – Terri Goss Kinzy assumed her role as the 20th President of Illinois State University Thursday, but there won’t be much of a honeymoon for them to get used to the job.

Your first meeting of the ISU Board of Trustees will take place on July 23rd. The university’s proposal to establish a College of Engineering goes to the Illinois Board of Higher Education in August. The fall semester starts on August 16 and Negotiations with the Graduate Workers Union will resume in the fall.

Kinzy, the first female president of the ISU, succeeds Larry Dietz, who retired on Wednesday after 10 years at the ISU. the last seven as president and 50 years in higher education.

“I feel like the state of Illinois needs a little more recognition for what it is and what it has achieved,” she said in an interview. “I’ll talk a lot about the history of the university.”

She wants people – including those who make government funding decisions – to learn more about ISU’s above-average scores Performance in areas such as student retention and graduation rates.

“I’m the daughter of a used car salesman,” she said.

Kinzy also knows how to listen.

“My first priority … is to talk to people and learn about their ISU experiences,” she said.

Kinzy began this process on campus visits since her appointment was announced in May. This includes not only Dietz and the management team, but also people she met on campus, including an ISU police officer and a facility employee.

“There is so much enthusiasm for the future of the institution,” she said. “Everyone I speak to speaks of the high quality of the study experience and the commitment to the students.”

Dietz was “Systematically bring me up to date” in weekly discussions, Kinzy said on budget plans, the College of Engineering proposal, ISU’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and other issues.

Upon learning about the budget process and funding flows, Kinzy said, “I was surprised to see Illinois State University has the lowest (state) funding per student in Illinois. “

She said, “We are working hard to make higher education as affordable as possible. … Constant and consistent funding from the state is an important part of this. “

Western Michigan University, where Kinzy was Vice President for Research and Innovation before joining ISU, has had a Teaching Assistants Union since 2006. The last four-year contract was approved in June 2018.

Kinzy said it was a good thing that a federal mediator was involved and she was confident that the negotiators could reach a mutually beneficial deal if talks that had been interrupted by the union resume.

As for the technical proposal, Kinzy noted that “a lot of time, effort and research” has been put into it and “I am confident that it is a significant need”.

She said “a willingness to take a small risk” when proposing a College of Engineering “shows a university that is forward-looking” and manpower-driven.

There is also the issue of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“From what I’ve learned,” said Kinzy, “I’m very impressed with the university’s COVID response … and the scientific methods they used.”

ISU intends to Return to a more traditional college dorm experience this fall, but plans for the transition are still under development, she said.

“As the optimistic person I am, I hope we learn from the COVID-19 experience,” said Kinzy.

Those lessons include having a place to study online, especially when students are away, working or doing an internship for the summer, she said. “This is an opportunity that we shouldn’t miss.”

In addition to telling the history of ISU and following ongoing work such as the engineering school, Kinzy’s priorities include “continuing attention and, equally importantly, maintaining” underrepresented faculties and “stepping up efforts to increase international enrollment”.

Kinzy said she was well aware of “what made Illinois State University a very special place,” adding, “Nobody wants to be the president who took a great institution and made it mediocre.”

She said there are opportunities to make a great institution even better and “those opportunities come from working together”.

Contact Lenore Sobota at (309) 820-3240. Follow her on Twitter: @Pg_Sobota



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The Debt Trap: Payday Loans On The Rise In Texas https://yeezys.org/the-debt-trap-payday-loans-on-the-rise-in-texas/ Fri, 03 Sep 2021 10:44:30 +0000 https://yeezys.org/the-debt-trap-payday-loans-on-the-rise-in-texas/ This credit shop is one of many on South Cooper Street in Arlington. Khampha Bouaphanh Star telegram Editor’s Note: A study shows the average Texan owes about $ 40,000. Nationwide, 2.5 million people counted payday lenders among their creditors in 2013. The Debt Trap is a community project of Star telegram, WFAA and the Austin […]]]>


title=

This credit shop is one of many on South Cooper Street in Arlington.

Khampha Bouaphanh

Star telegram

Editor’s Note: A study shows the average Texan owes about $ 40,000. Nationwide, 2.5 million people counted payday lenders among their creditors in 2013. The Debt Trap is a community project of Star telegram, WFAA and the Austin American statesman The aim is to shed light on the seemingly easy money, loans that either help or destroy the economically disadvantaged, depending on who you ask. This rate examines payday loans. The next installments will cover auto title loans, reverse mortgages, and student loans.

Rev. Wendel “Buck” Cass, a retired Tarrant County employee, is usually on a tight budget. But when his car broke down a few years ago, money was tight, so he took out a $ 500 payday loan from a lender on McCart Avenue, Fort Worth.

Cass, 69, expected to pay an additional $ 50 to $ 125 to secure the loan. But after three months when he could afford to pay it off, he owed more than $ 300 in interest. He ended up paying over $ 810 to borrow $ 500.

“I’ll go broke if I ever do this again,” said Cass, a local pastor at Morning Chapel CME in Fort Worth. “What a rip off.”

Proponents of payday loans, a growing business across the state, say they are a lifeline for people desperate for cash. Critics say lenders exploit the poor and Texas laws do little to protect consumers.

“People in Texas have long had payday loans,” said Rob Norcross, spokesman for the Consumer Service Alliance, the Texas payday trading group of 3,000 lenders. “It’s gotten more popular over the past decade.”

Tarrant County in particular is a hot spot. Clusters of shops line the streets from Fort Worth to South Arlington to Haltom City. There are 11 stores running stores on East Lancaster Avenue. South Arlington had more than 55 locations on a 5-mile stretch between Interstate 20 and Interstate 30, 2012-13 show records. See interactive map

“The payday loan market has grown due to popular demand,” said Fort Worth Mayor Betsy Price. “Businesses tend to be born out of demand.”

Norcross agreed that the marketplace works well.

Along with the number of businesses, the fees Texans pay to secure payday loans similar to Cass’s have increased in recent years. show state records.

Critics, including anti-poverty and church groups like the Wesley Mission Center in Mansfield, say the loans create a debt trap.

“My advice to everyone, if you don’t need it, don’t do it, don’t do it, don’t do it,” said Thomas Richards of Dallas, who borrowed $ 300 from a payday lender and paid back more than $ 600 . “It is a trap.”

Rev. Terry White, pastor of Marsalis Avenue Missionary Baptist Church in Dallas, said dozens in his ward were trapped. Some have to refinance the loans again and again because they cannot pay off in 14 days. The results can be disastrous, White said.

“After four weeks, you might be paying $ 180 in interest on a $ 200 loan,” he said. “I wasn’t aware of the interest rate that was calculated and compounded.”

John Siburt, president and chief operations officer of CitySquare, an anti-poverty group in Dallas, said the business model was exploitative.

“It seems unethical and immoral to make millions of dollars on the backs of poor people,” he said.

High interest rates

Texas borrowers who deposit within 14 days pay an interest rate of approximately 22 percent. So the typical borrower on a single payment payday loan of $ 500 pays an additional $ 110 in interest.

But after 90 days, the borrower is hooked thanks to compound interest for $ 1,270. The rate climbs to 154 percent and interest rates pile up quickly.

Financing costs are complex because lenders offer different types of credit. In addition, the state does not enforce a rate cap. Nor does it tell the payday lenders how much to charge or how to structure the loans. The result: Virtually any interest rate or fee can be charged on an extended loan.

The opposing camps disagree on the percentage of borrowers who fall into the debt trap.

Norcross says only 10 percent of borrowers are involved.

“Ninety percent of people pay back their loans when they are due,” he said.

But payday critics say there are more borrowers like Richardson’s Wanda Riley. Last year she owed $ 1,229 on seven active loans. They started out at $ 121- $ 246, according to an advisor to a charity that helped Riley get out of debt.

“You get a loan, and then you have to get another one because you can’t pay the first one, and then you get another loan to pay it off,” Riley said.

Information from the State Office for Consumer Credit, which admits it sometimes needs to correct errors in the data reported by lenders, speaks for critics.

The data shows that more than half of borrowers refinance more than once. In the Fort Worth-Arlington area, 55.24 percent of consumers have refinanced their lump sum loans, according to data Data for the second quarter for 2014.

A federal report confirms this. A 2014 to learn by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau found that 4 out of 5 payday loans are extended or renewed within 14 days.

“Abused by this system”

Kathleen Hicks of Fort Worth struggled and lost the political battle of her career for payday loans while serving on the city council.

She embarked on a seven-year crusade to stop the proliferation of payday lenders in her southeastern district, where the poor and working class are battling for access to credit, she says.

“People are being abused by this system,” said Hicks.

Opponents of the council, including councilor Frank Moss, partnered with payday loan lobbyist Tonya Veasey, wife of now United States MP Marc Veasey, D-Fort Worth, to pressure the city into zoning restrictions on payday lenders to loosen up, according to email correspondence between Tonya Veasey and councilors in November 2009.

Councilor Sal Espino, who served when Hicks was waging their war on industry, said he was in favor of drafting an ordinance similar to that in Dallas and other cities to limit payday loan deals at major intersections and in certain neighborhoods. The regulations also limit loan amounts based on borrowers’ incomes and penalize lenders who violate state laws.

“In my opinion, if we passed a regulation now, we would continue to put pressure on lawmakers to do something to protect consumers,” said Espino.

In the Fort Worth-Arlington area, only Saginaw, Watauga, and Flower Mound restrict payday lenders, according to the Texas Municipal League. See the full nationwide list here.

It remains to be seen whether the legislature will address the issue at this session.

Last meeting, a bill by then-Sen. John Carona, R-Dallas, who proposed a nationwide limit on payday loans in the House of Representatives, failed.

At that session, Senator Royce West, D-Dallas, and Rep. Helen Giddings, D-DeSoto said they have not given up on passing a measure to revise payday loans and auto title loans.

Giddings said she supports West’s Senate Bill 121, which is designed to protect Texans from high-interest loans that can skyrocket among borrowers.

“People are stuck,” said Giddings.

The move is intended to set conditions for expanded payment plans, add interest caps, and prohibit debt collection agencies from using threats and coercion.

No changes in sight

Fort Worth is unlikely to revisit the subject.

Price said she wasn’t interested.

“Who should I say you shouldn’t get this loan when you’re desperate?” She said.

The industry has sued cities for putting restrictions in place, but the challenges have largely failed.

Fort Worth Storefronts employees declined to comment. Repeated attempts to reach out to Jay B. Shipowitz, CEO of Ace Cash Express, a payday lender in Irving, have been unsuccessful.

Some lenders, including one of the largest in the country, Cash america, headquartered in Fort Worth, has closed most stores in cities that have passed the ordinances, Norcross said.

A spokeswoman for Fort Worth’s Cash America, a publicly traded company with a volume of $ 1.8 billion, said it had shut down most of its payday loan business in Texas so it could focus on its pawnshop business.

In November 2013, Cash America reached a $ 19 million settlement with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau after allegations of abusive practices, such as military gazing and “robo-signing,” a practice that sued customers for overdue debt will .

Norcross said Price’s position – that the city should stay out of it and leave it to the state to legislate – could work and that the industry could seek a compromise.

A “middle ground,” he said, would be to give people more time to repay. For example, lenders would allow borrowers to repay $ 400 over six weeks instead of four, he said.

“It would give people a better way to successfully repay their loans,” he said.

“The payday loan is out”

Tonya Veasey took a similar stance in her 2009 email to Council members.

“These companies are the only safe and reliable financial services locations” for underserved communities, it said in her email.

Tonya Veasey and Moss did not answer calls to comment.

Hicks said Fort Worth disappointed residents by refusing to restrict payday lenders.

“I wish people just had more courage,” she said.

Richards, 56 – the Dallas borrower – said he learned a valuable lesson. He borrowed the $ 300 after his social security check was two months late and he couldn’t pay his rent or buy groceries. He said his payout was more than $ 600.

Nowadays, he sets aside $ 25 every month and puts it on a debit card.

“If I need something, I’ll have it there,” said Richards. “The payday loan is out. I don’t dance to this song anymore. “

Tim Eaton, an associate of the Austin American-Statesman, contributed to this report.

This story was originally published February 7, 2015, 6:10 p.m.



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