Top-selling shoe – Yeezys http://yeezys.org/ Fri, 13 May 2022 15:11:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://yeezys.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-2021-10-14T150347.692-120x120.png Top-selling shoe – Yeezys http://yeezys.org/ 32 32 Tesco is testing in-store co-working space https://yeezys.org/tesco-is-testing-in-store-co-working-space/ Fri, 13 May 2022 15:11:21 +0000 https://yeezys.org/tesco-is-testing-in-store-co-working-space/ Tesco, the UK’s largest grocery chain, really expands on the idea of ​​the supermarket. According to a report by The Guardian, the grocer is piloting an initiative to bring 3,800 square meters of flexible workspace to a store in south London’s New Malden, in partnership with office space operator IWG. Additionally, the space will be […]]]>

Tesco, the UK’s largest grocery chain, really expands on the idea of ​​the supermarket.

According to a report by The Guardian, the grocer is piloting an initiative to bring 3,800 square meters of flexible workspace to a store in south London’s New Malden, in partnership with office space operator IWG. Additionally, the space will be located on the store’s upper mezzanine level and will include 30 co-working spaces, 12 OpenDesks (a more private option) and a meeting room, according to The Independent.

“We’re excited to be working with IWG to offer customers the ability to work more flexibly from their local Tesco,” Louise Gutland, head of strategic partnerships at Tesco, in a statement. “We’re always striving to better serve our customers and communities, and we’re excited to see how they respond to this new opportunity.”

This workspace is reportedly taking up space formerly occupied by items that consumers no longer buy from brick-and-mortar stores — such as music and videos, and electronics. It’s not yet known if such spaces are planned in the future, although The Guardian reported that it “is thought likely” that the companies will expand their partnership if this location proves popular.

“People don’t want to commute hours every day and instead want to live and work in their local communities,” IWG Founder and CEO Markus Dixon said in a statement. “A Tesco Extra in a suburban location in the heart of a vibrant community is the perfect location for flexible office space.”

The news comes as grocers on every continent are using their position to expand into additional non-food categories. These companies are in a unique position among retailers as they regularly get customers through the door, often several times a week, as groceries are a daily necessity.

By trying out new offerings that target other parts of shoppers’ daily routines, these supermarkets are able to build deeper relationships with their customers. PYMNTS research found that businesses that engage with consumers across more pillars of the connected economy — how they work, pay and get paid, shop, eat, bank, travel and have fun, connect with others, stay healthy and live – are at an advantage in today’s competitive market.

Continue reading: How consumers live in the connected economy

Take the Hy-Vee supermarket chain, for example, which operates more than 280 stores in the Midwest. The grocer announced in September that it was working with exercise equipment brand Johnson Fitness & Wellness to offer fitness showrooms in select stores where shoppers can try out treadmills, elliptical trainers, stationary bikes and other equipment.

See more: Hy-Vee opens fitness showrooms

That same month, Texas supermarket chain HEB, which operates hundreds of stores in Texas and Mexico, announced its partnership with retailer James Avery Artisan Jewelry to bring jewelry stores into its stores.

Continue reading: HEB joins store-in-a-store trend with new partnership with jewelry stores

With initiatives like these, grocers are expanding their relationship with their customers beyond their shopping routines and becoming a more integral part of customers’ lives.

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NEW PAYMENT DETAILS: THE TRUTH ABOUT BNPL AND STORE CARDS – APRIL 2022

Above: Shoppers who have loyalty cards use them for 87% of all eligible purchases — but that doesn’t mean retailers should launch “buy now, pay later” (BNPL) options at checkout. The Truth About BNPL And Store Cards, a collaboration between PYMNTS and PayPal, surveyed 2,161 consumers to find out why providing BNPL and store cards is key to helping merchants maximize conversion.

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Council recap: Nothing beats cash: Newly approved pilot program will provide 85 households with $1,000 a month – News https://yeezys.org/council-recap-nothing-beats-cash-newly-approved-pilot-program-will-provide-85-households-with-1000-a-month-news/ Thu, 12 May 2022 05:03:13 +0000 https://yeezys.org/council-recap-nothing-beats-cash-newly-approved-pilot-program-will-provide-85-households-with-1000-a-month-news/ The city council at its May 5 meeting approved a pilot program to provide 85 households with monthly payments of $1,000 for a full year. Once people are included in the guaranteed income Pilot, you do not have to “prove” that you still need the assistance, as many government financial assistance programs typically require. The […]]]>

The city council at its May 5 meeting approved a pilot program to provide 85 households with monthly payments of $1,000 for a full year. Once people are included in the guaranteed income Pilot, you do not have to “prove” that you still need the assistance, as many government financial assistance programs typically require.

The pilot will cost $1.18 million, of which $152,000 will be paid UpTogether, a California non-profit organization that will administer the program. The remaining funds, approved by the council as an addendum to the budget for fiscal year 2022, will go to eligible families. UpTogether has experience managing direct cash assistance in Austin as part of the city COVID-19 Relief efforts and works with the St David’s Foundation on a similar guaranteed income pilot program.

These programs are guided by two core principles: that poor people know best what to spend their money on, and that their needs can change faster than traditional public assistance programs (rent subsidies, meal subsidies, childcare subsidies, etc.) can keep high. Austin Chief Equity Officer Brion oaksreferred to investigations by the city in a memo to the council innovation office who noted that fast-breaking financial “shocks” are “the most prominent driver.”[s] of eviction” as they mix with other financial burdens—like overdue bills that drive up late fees or payday loans that accrue interest—that can lead to evictions. Unrestricted income support, Oaks wrote, is not a “gift” of public money but a “vital investment in families and individuals” that can improve their health and wealth to the point where they require less long-term help from the public sector.

mayor Steve Adler alluded to this in his comments before the Council approved the programme. “I just think [it’s] so misleading and so wrong” for people to characterize government aid programs as “giveaways,” he said?” Adler also linked the guaranteed income program, which he hopes employees can expand and sustain in the years to come after the pilot, with the city’s broader efforts to reduce homelessness.

Mayor Per Tem Alison age voted against the program and stated in a pre-vote remark that it was a complex decision for them. Alter acknowledged that the program would help families in need, but given the tremendous need in the city and the limited financial resources the city can dedicate to meet those needs, she felt it wasn’t the right kind of program for the city. “When I look at all the levers I have to help families meet basic needs,” Alter said, “I don’t come to the conclusion that this investment is the best path for me at this point in time this needs to respond.” Council members Leslie pool and Mackenzie Kellywho both have similar reservations about guaranteed income (and, in Kelly’s case, the proper role of government), did not attend the May 5 meeting.

Guaranteed income programs have lofty goals, and while similar programs exist in about 50 American cities, they remain largely untested as a means of reducing poverty. The council’s vote on creating Austin’s pilot project was postponed from its April 21 meeting, in part because of questions about evaluating its effectiveness. Employee intends to work with Municipal Institute, a DC-based think tank, to assess the program’s success. This analysis includes interviews with participants and stakeholders to identify potential improvements for future iterations of the program, and a “quasi-experimental quantitative analysis” comparing results for program participants and non-participants. Some suggested metrics include the ability to cover a $400 emergency expense; Ability to access preventive health care and eat healthily; and “Ability to live a full life,” which could be measured by how often guardians cook meals for children or have time for hobbies and interests.

CMs also raised concerns that Texas law may not allow for a guaranteed income program that is not designed to address specific public policy challenges the city is facing. Staff intend to focus on qualifying indicators to select participants, such as: B. Households facing eviction, utility customers who consistently miss payments, or people transitioning from homelessness to supportive housing.

For now, all the data we have on UpTogether’s success comes from the nonprofit itself. At a press conference earlier in the day Ivana Neri, Southwest Partnership Director of UpTogether, said preliminary results from the St. David’s Foundation pilot showed that all 125 participants in the program used the money to pay for basic necessities such as shelter, food, clothing and gas. An independent analysis of a publicly funded pilot project could go a long way toward testing the underlying theory of guaranteed income: that empowering people through unlimited financial support can be an efficient and more dignified way to reduce poverty.

Do you have something to say? That timeline welcomes opinion contributions on any topic from the community. Submit yours now at austinchronicle.com/opinion.

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Council recap: Nothing beats cash: City launches guaranteed income pilot program https://yeezys.org/council-recap-nothing-beats-cash-city-launches-guaranteed-income-pilot-program/ Fri, 06 May 2022 17:00:38 +0000 https://yeezys.org/council-recap-nothing-beats-cash-city-launches-guaranteed-income-pilot-program/ The city council at its Thursday, May 5 meeting approved a pilot program to provide $1,000 in monthly payments to 85 households for a full year. Once people are included in the guaranteed income Pilot, you do not have to “prove” that you still need the assistance, as many government grant programs typically require. The […]]]>

The city council at its Thursday, May 5 meeting approved a pilot program to provide $1,000 in monthly payments to 85 households for a full year. Once people are included in the guaranteed income Pilot, you do not have to “prove” that you still need the assistance, as many government grant programs typically require.

The pilot will cost $1.18 million, of which $152,000 will be paid UpTogether, a California-based nonprofit with which the city is partnering to administer the program. The remaining funds, approved by Council as an addendum to the FY2022 budget, will go to eligible families. UpTogether has experience managing direct cash assistance in Austin as part of the city COVID-19 Relief Efforts in 2020 (when the group was still known as The Family Independence Initiative) and also works with the St David’s Foundation on a similar guaranteed income pilot program.

These programs are guided by two core principles: that poor people know best what to spend their money on, and that their needs can change faster than traditional government support programs (rent subsidies, meal subsidies, childcare subsidies, etc.) can keep high. Austin Chief Equity Officer Brion oaksreferred to investigations by the city in a memo to the council innovation office who have noted that such quick-breaking “financial shocks” are “the most prominent causes of displacement” as they mix with other financial stresses — such as overdue bills causing arrears fees or payday loans with interest — that can lead to eviction. Unrestricted income support, Oaks wrote, should not be viewed as a “gift” of public money, but as a “crucial investment in families and individuals” that can improve their health and wealth to the point where they require less help from the public sector in the long-term.

mayor Steve Adler alluded to these ideas in his comments before the Council approved the program. “I just think [it’s] so misleading and so wrong” for people to characterize government aid programs as “giveaways,” the mayor said. “The concept tested is, What if you actually trust people to get a dollar and spend it in whatever way makes most sense for their family?” Adler also linked the Guaranteed Income Program, which he hopes will help the Employees will be able to expand and sustain it for years to come after the pilot, with the city’s broader efforts to reduce homelessness.

Mayor Per Tem Alison age voted against the program and stated in a comment before the vote that it was a complex decision for them. Alter acknowledged that the program would help families in need, but given the tremendous need in the city and the limited financial resources the city can dedicate to meet those needs, she felt a guaranteed income wasn’t the right thing kind of program for the city to take over. “When I look at all the levers I have to help families meet basic needs,” Alter said. “I have not been able to conclude that this investment is the best way for me to address those needs at this time.” Leslie pool and Mackenzie Kellyboth of whom have similar reservations about guaranteed income (and, in Kelly’s case, the proper role of government), did not attend the May 5 meeting.

Guaranteed income programs have lofty goals, and while similar programs exist in about 50 American cities, they remain largely untested as a means of reducing poverty. The council’s vote on creating Austin’s pilot project was postponed from its April 21 meeting, in part because of questions about evaluating its effectiveness. Employee intends to work with Municipal Institute, a DC-based think tank, to assess the program’s success. This analysis includes interviews with participants and stakeholders to identify potential improvements for future iterations of the program, and a “quasi-experimental quantitative analysis” comparing results for program participants and non-participants. Some suggested metrics include the ability to cover a $400 emergency expense; Ability to access preventive health care and eat healthily; and “Ability to live a full life,” which could be measured by how often guardians cook meals for children or have time for hobbies and interests.

Concerns have also been raised by CMs that Texas law may not permit a guaranteed income program that is not designed to address specific public policy challenges the city is facing. Staff intend to focus on qualifying indicators to select participants, such as: B. Households facing eviction, utility customers who consistently miss payments, or people transitioning from homelessness to supportive housing.

For now, all the data we have on UpTogether’s success comes from the nonprofit itself. At a press conference earlier in the day Ivana Neri, Southwest Partnership Director of UpTogether, said preliminary results from the St. David’s Foundation pilot showed that all 125 participants in the program used the money to pay for basic necessities such as shelter, food, clothing and gas. An independent analysis of a publicly funded pilot project could go a long way towards testing the underlying theory of guaranteed income – that empowering people through unlimited financial support can be both an efficient and a more dignified way to reduce poverty.

Do you have something to say? That timeline welcomes opinion contributions on any topic from the community. Submit yours now at austinchronicle.com/opinion.

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Kansas Baseball Tops Omaha as Jayhawks Record Program Win Number 2,000 https://yeezys.org/kansas-baseball-tops-omaha-as-jayhawks-record-program-win-number-2000/ Thu, 05 May 2022 12:06:18 +0000 https://yeezys.org/kansas-baseball-tops-omaha-as-jayhawks-record-program-win-number-2000/ Kansas Baseball Tops Omaha as Jayhawks Record Program Win Number 2,000 details Kansas Jayhawks Athletics baseball May 05, 2022 Kansas Baseball won its 2,000th game in program history Wednesday, beating Omaha 11-3 at Tal Anderson […]]]>

Kansas Baseball Tops Omaha as Jayhawks Record Program Win Number 2,000

Kansas Baseball won its 2,000th game in program history Wednesday, beating Omaha 11-3 at Tal Anderson Field. Head Coach Ritch Price has been at the helm for 580 of those 2,000 program wins.

Pitchers of record
Victory: Stone Hewlett (2-1)
End line: 2.0 IP, 0 H, 0 R, 0 BB, 2 SO

Loss: Parker Weddle (0-1)
End line: 2.0 IP, 5 H, 5 R, 2 BB, 3 SO

HOW IT HAPPENED
• Omaha (20-22) took a 3-0 lead early in the first inning when Eduardo Rosario hit a three-run homer.
• Kansas put up nine runs in the third inning to take a comfortable 9-3 lead. KU sent 15 hitters to the plate and scored the nine runs and seven hits.
• With bases loaded and no outs, Caleb Upshaw and Nolan Metcalf each delivered RBI singles to close the gap to 3-2.
• Jack Hammond and Ryan Callahan would then have their own RBI singles before Jake English hit a sacrificial fly and gave the Jayhawks a 5-3 lead.
• Payton Allen then hit a two-run single down the middle before Dylan Ditzenberger closed the inning with a two-run double for a 9-3.
• The Jayhawks added two runs on RBI singles by Hammond and English in the fourth inning.

PLAYER OF THE GAME
Caleb Upshaw: After being named Big 12 Co-Player of the Week and Newcomer of the Week, Upshaw went 2-on-4 with an RBI, a run score and a walk.

NUMBER OF THE GAME
2000: In Kansas’ 132nd baseball season, the Jayhawks won their 2,000. Game. The program’s first season was 1880, but KU did not field a team for several years.

QUOTABLE
“I think everyone who has ever coached at KU is really proud of the achievement that was achieved today. Two thousand wins for one program is incredible. If you factor in the weather in Kansas, when Coach Temple and the young men before him were the coaches, when they didn’t have indoor facilities and no turf back then, you had to be tough to play in Kansas those days. I’m just proud to be involved and proud to be part of the program. I want to compliment all the previous coaches and of course the players because this is a player game. It’s an amazing achievement.” – Head Coach Ritch Price

REMARKS
• Kansas’ nine runs scored in the third inning were the most in an inning this season.
• Tavian Josenberger extended his on-base streak to 22 games.
• Upshaw have scored at least two goals in six of their last seven games. He has 15 multi-hit attempts this season.
• Allen had his first multi-hit game of his career.
• Metcalf finished 2-for-4 with an RBI, two runs scored and a walk. He now has 14 multi-hit games this year.

NEXT
Kansas (19-27) will travel to Manhattan for the Dillons Sunflower Showdown against Kansas State on Friday at 6pm CT. All three games will be broadcast on Big 12 NOW on ESPN+ and live audio will be available on the Jayhawk Sports Network.

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Carrying on student debt for years can be detrimental to your heart health https://yeezys.org/carrying-on-student-debt-for-years-can-be-detrimental-to-your-heart-health/ Wed, 04 May 2022 17:26:18 +0000 https://yeezys.org/carrying-on-student-debt-for-years-can-be-detrimental-to-your-heart-health/ Share on PinterestStudents at the George Washington University campus in Washington, DC, U.S. on Thursday, September 9, 2021. Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg/Getty Images Long-term student debt is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease and higher levels of chronic inflammation. In 2020, the average US student debt on graduation from university or college ranged from $18,350 […]]]>

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Students at the George Washington University campus in Washington, DC, U.S. on Thursday, September 9, 2021. Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg/Getty Images
  • Long-term student debt is associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease and higher levels of chronic inflammation.
  • In 2020, the average US student debt on graduation from university or college ranged from $18,350 in Utah to almost $40,000 in New Hampshire.
  • People with midlife debt were 90 percent more likely to have a psychiatric disorder and 31 percent more likely to have high blood pressure.

College debt, like other financial stressors, can affect a person’s mental health and well-being and reduce their life satisfaction.

But continuing unpaid college debt — or taking on new college debt — between young adulthood and midlife also increases cardiovascular disease risk, according to a new study.

In contrast, researchers found that adults who were able to pay off college debt had similar or better heart health than people who never faced college debt.

“As the cost of college has increased, students and their families have taken on more debt to get to and stay in college,” the study author said Adam M. Lippert, Ph.Dan assistant professor in the department of sociology at the University of Colorado Denver said in a press release.

In 2020, the average US student debt on graduation from university or college ranged from $18,350 in Utah to almost $40,000 in New Hampshire The Institute for University Access and Success.

This is the average, so some students take on much more debt to pay for school.

“Unless steps are taken to lower the cost of college and forgive outstanding debt, the health consequences of rising student loan debt are likely to increase,” Lippert said.

The researchers used data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (also known as Add Health), which enrolled over 20,000 adolescents in grades 7 through 12.

Participants were first interviewed in 1994-95 and then four more times until 2018.

In the latest round, around 4,200 people – now aged 33 to 44 – underwent medical screening, including the giving of blood samples.

The researchers calculated each person’s risk of cardiovascular disease based on several factors – gender, age, blood pressure, use of treatments for high blood pressure, cigarette smoking, diabetes and body mass index.

This provided an estimate of a person’s risk of developing cardiovascular disease — such as heart failure, heart attack, stroke and coronary death — over the next 30 years.

The researchers also used the participants’ blood samples to measure C-reactive protein (CRP), a biomarker of inflammation in the body. This has been linked to prolonged or chronic exposure to stress.

In addition, in the third and fifth round of interviews, the participants answered questions about their student debt.

Of these, 37 percent reported no student debt at that time; 12 percent had paid off their student loans by then; 28 percent took out student loans at the time; and 24 percent had persistent student debt.

Researchers found that people who constantly had college debt or got into debt had higher cardiovascular risk scores than people who never had college debt or had never paid off their loans.

Additionally, people who constantly had college debt had higher readings of chronic inflammation than those who never had debt. And those who took on debt had higher levels of inflammation compared to those who paid off their loans.

In contrast, people who were able to pay off college debt had lower cardiovascular risk scores than people who never owed college or university.

The study was published May 3 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Joseph D Wolfe, PhDassociate professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, said the new study’s findings are consistent with other research on the effects of debt on health.

“In my work we have found that health problems are linked to over-indebtedness [owing more money than you own in assets] are often due to unsecured debt,” he said.

Unsecured debt is any debt that is not linked to an asset. The most common types are credit cards, payday loans, and medical debt.

This differs from secured debt, such as a mortgage or car loan, which is tied to a physical asset.

In a study published last year in The Journals of Gerontology: Series BWolfe and his colleagues found that people with over-indebtedness in midlife were 90 percent more likely to have a psychiatric disorder and 31 percent more likely to have hypertension.

“Health problems are usually linked to unsecured debt through the stress and worries associated with financial difficulties,” he said.

Taking out a large loan to buy a home may not create the same stress.

“In my research, I found that this is high [secured] Debt is related to the high value of an individual’s wealth,” Wolfe said. “In these cases, debt can even have a positive association with health.”

But people with secured debt can also experience financial stress, for example when they can’t afford their mortgage payments.

In another study Adrianne Frech, PhDan associate professor at the University of Missouri’s School of Health Professions, and her colleagues found that carrying long-term unsecured debt was associated with poorer physical health later in life.

Specifically, they found that people with consistently high levels of debt were 76 percent more likely to experience pain later in life that interfered with their daily activities, compared to those with no unsecured debt.

This level of pain can even affect their ability to work and make it difficult for them to pay their debts.

“The more surprising finding,” Frech added, “is that people who repay their debt earlier in adulthood continue to experience more pain at age 50 than people who had no unsecured debt at all.”

“So just having that debt in the past was associated with greater pain,” she said.

This research was published in the journal last year SSM – Public Health.

Although student loans aren’t typically considered unsecured debt, for those who don’t finish school, these loans can feel similar to credit card debt or medical debt, Frech said.

“They have this enormous debt that isn’t tied to a degree’s net worth,” she said. “So student debt can put someone in a really vulnerable position if they don’t graduate from college.”

However, some people who graduate from university or college still have difficulty paying off their student loans, which negatively impacts their health.

Wolfe doesn’t see student debt as inherently unhealthy. Instead, he said it depends on the amount of debt and the amount of time people carry that debt.

Likewise, Lippert and his colleagues write that the new study’s findings suggest college debt is a “double-edged sword.”

Taking out student loans gives people access to colleges and universities, which can benefit heart-related and overall health — at least for those who can repay their loans.

Other research shows that a four-year degree is associated with it better health and less inflammation.

Lippert and his colleagues write that, in general, the health benefits of a college or university degree outweigh the risks of student credit.

“The adverse effects of poverty or lack of college readiness outweigh the impact of student loans on cardiovascular health,” Lippert told Healthline.

However, for people struggling to pay off their debts, these health benefits may be limited.

“Our results show that those who have college degrees have better cardiovascular health than those without a four-year qualification,” Lippert said, “although these benefits are weaker for those with college degrees who manage student loan debt over multiple years.”

This suggests that helping people maximize the benefits of their time at university or college could reduce the negative health effects of student debt.

“We could address this issue by making higher education more affordable and improving the pipeline from academia to the workforce,” Wolfe said.

Additionally, “we can create policies that regulate companies that are holding people captive for decades [student] debt,” he added.

Frech believes more needs to be done to help students get the most out of college debt they have incurred.

“Universities make money from high enrollments, so they will do whatever it takes to get students to enroll initially,” she said.

“But they won’t always do enough to make students successful or weed out students who may not be as successful as they need to be,” she added.

]]> Biggest pitfalls, mistakes and how to dig out https://yeezys.org/biggest-pitfalls-mistakes-and-how-to-dig-out/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 10:45:00 +0000 https://yeezys.org/biggest-pitfalls-mistakes-and-how-to-dig-out/ According to the New York Federal Reserve, consumer debt reached $14.56 trillion after the fourth quarter of 2020. TEMPLE, Texas — Debt remains a major problem in America, according to the New York Federal Reserve and Debt.org, which showed Consumer debt in 2020 was almost 14.5 percent. Lourdes Zuniga, the Executive Director of Pathways to […]]]>

According to the New York Federal Reserve, consumer debt reached $14.56 trillion after the fourth quarter of 2020.

TEMPLE, Texas — Debt remains a major problem in America, according to the New York Federal Reserve and Debt.org, which showed Consumer debt in 2020 was almost 14.5 percent.

Lourdes Zuniga, the Executive Director of Pathways to Financial Health from Austin, said the biggest mistake people make is overspending and urges people to know what you have and spend less, even if it makes life a little uncomfortable for a while .

“I think people think I have a credit card and that’s why I’m going to use it and that’s why they operate it,” she said. “Try not to do that. The biggest mistake people make is overspending and living beyond their means.”

Bill Fay, who writes for Debt.org, wrote in one updated piece 2021 for the page about debt in four main areas:

  • home – Total mortgage debt rose to $10.4 trillion, up $1 trillion from the same point in 2017. Fay called the increase in this type of debt an overall good thing.
  • Automatic — Total auto debt for the fourth quarter of 2020 is $1.37 trillion, a $100 billion jump from the same point in 2018.
  • student loans – They continue to escalate, growing to a record $1.56 trillion in the fourth quarter of 2020, up $100 billion from the same point in 2018. The average student debt in 2020 was $38,792.
  • credit cards – Credit card debt was $820 billion in the fourth quarter of 2020, reflecting a slowdown in consumer spending during the pandemic after this debt category peaked at $930 billion a year earlier. The good news is that credit card debt actually declined in 2020, the first decline in a major consumer debt category in seven years.

Zuniga, who has helped many low-income families find financial freedom, said her biggest piece of advice for anyone struggling: Avoid predatory lenders at all costs, even if it means strapping in for a rougher route.

“Avoid going to payday loans, avoid going to robbery loans, and avoid going to some auto loans because these products are designed to never have an end date,” she said. “Read the fine print and all they do is you will stay in this cycle forever.”

The Pew Charitable Trusts, a organization for information the public by providing useful data that sheds light on the issues and trends shaping our world, said most payday loans are prohibitively expensive for most borrowers and tied to their payment cycle.

“The average payday loan requires a one-time repayment of $430 on the next payday, which consumes 36 percent of the average borrower’s gross paycheck,” the organization explained on its website. “However, research shows that most borrowers cannot afford more than 5 percent while covering the basic costs at the same time.”

According to PEW, the average payday borrower is in debt five months out of the year and spending on average $520 in fees to borrow $375 repeatedly. The average fee for an in-store loan deal is $55 per two weeks.

Texas has none specified maximum loan amount borrowers can take. There is also no fixed maximum funding fee with an APR that can be in excess of 400%.

While Zuniga has previously urged many to stop taking out payday loans, she also said people need to stop running away from their financial problems, demands a free credit report every year and make a plan with those you owe money to.

“People are very forgiving and I don’t think we see that with collectors, but if you contact them and show good faith often, they are willing to negotiate with you as long as you are willing to make that commitment to them and to me.” I’ll pay you,” she said.

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NYC fights for more Community Land Trust funding https://yeezys.org/nyc-fights-for-more-community-land-trust-funding/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 10:01:25 +0000 https://yeezys.org/nyc-fights-for-more-community-land-trust-funding/ The city council is introducing a series of new bills designed to improve access for nonprofit organizations to purchase affordable housing Dressed in bright yellow T-shirts and holding signs reading “our land, our homes, controlled by us” and “public lands for the common good,” several dozen members of New York City’s Community Land Trusts (CLTs) […]]]>

The city council is introducing a series of new bills designed to improve access for nonprofit organizations to purchase affordable housing

Dressed in bright yellow T-shirts and holding signs reading “our land, our homes, controlled by us” and “public lands for the common good,” several dozen members of New York City’s Community Land Trusts (CLTs) held a rally City Hall on April 14th. They pushed for Mayor Eric Adams and the NYC City Council to add $3 million to the city budget for fiscal year 2023 for CLTs. They were joined by elected officials, including City Council members Carlina Rivera, Tiffany Caban, Sandy Nurse and Carmen De La Rosa, and Comptroller Brad Lander.

“A lot of our neighborhoods are being gobbled up by these private equity-backed LLCs and corporations,” Councilor Sandy Nurse said at the rally. “This is a tool that we have and a tool that we need and that we need to fund,” she said.

Hannah Anousheh is the sole employee of East New York CLT, which was formed in the early months of the pandemic as the recession intensified neighborhood foreclosures. “As we like to say, we were born of fire,” Anousheh told Next City.

The Community Land Trust model holds ownership of land in the hands of a not-for-profit organization. The nonprofit organization typically enters into a 99-year leasehold agreement with residents, who then join a panel where they have a say in the CLT’s rules, such as eligibility criteria, maintenance fees and resale values. Residents can also build equity while paying the ground rent, but that equity is limited as the resale value of the home is usually limited to keep it affordable for the next resident.

Anousheh says each of the city’s CLTs received around $98,000 in fiscal 2022. That was not enough to hire several employees while covering other administrative costs. That’s why last Thursday’s rally calling for the city to double its CLT funding produced representatives from four of the city’s five boroughs, including the East Harlem El Barrio CLT and the Cooper Square CLT, the first of the City.

That includes Western Queens CLT, which is on the hunt repossess a building originally planned as Amazon’s headquarters in Long Island City. Owned by the Department of Education, the building could be a hub for local businesses, manufacturing jobs and low-cost artist spaces, Western Queens CLT members argue. Also taking part in the rally was the Bronx CLT, an offshoot of the non-profit Northwest Bronx Community and Clergy Coalition (NWBCCC). Bronx CLT is work to acquire the vacant Kingsbridge Armory, among others.

“The CLT effort actually stems from tenant organizing efforts to make sure we’re not just fighting back, but thinking about how we can take control of buildings,” Edward Garcia, a community organizer at NWBCCC, told Next City .

Anousheh says the East New York CLT has not yet acquired any land, but has been involved in actions aimed at acquiring more land for the Land Trust, including the Cancel the Tax Lien Sale campaign, which urged tax-defaulters Plots of land can be purchased from non-profit organizations. (While the legislature authorizes the city’s tax lien sale for another four years was not renewedAdams hasn’t committed to turning indebted properties into land trusts, like East New York CLT had wanted.) With additional funding, Anousheh said they could hire more administrative staff, including an organizing manager and an operations manager, to get more neighbors interested in cross-laminated lumber.

“For each CLT group to independently hire an employee, we need that,” she told Next City. “It’s comparable to other organizing coalitions.”

Carmen De La Rosa is a council member representing District 10, which includes Marble Hill, Washington Heights and Inwood in Upper Manhattan. She told Next City that many of the mostly Hispanic, longtime community members in her district are hungry for solutions that will stabilize their neighborhoods, which face an ongoing risk of displacement. She says the risk was heightened by a controversial issue 2018 rededication of Inwood, one of nine neighborhoods citywide that had been rededicated during Bill de Blasio’s mayorship. This rezoning was intended to increase housing production by allowing developers to build taller housing in exchange for a mandate that 25% of all units remain affordable. But one report of the Association of Neighborhood and Housing Development found that this type of neighborhood-wide rezoning did not produce as high a ratio of affordable units as neighborhoods without rezoning.

“One of the things that really strikes me is the lack of affordability, especially when reallocations come into play,” De La Rosa told Next City. “That’s why I support the Community Land Trust model, because I believe we’re giving property back to our communities.”

While there is sometimes skepticism about community land trusts from communities that have been excluded from formal means of wealth creation like home ownership, De La Rosa says people in her community are more focused on the short-term project of stabilizing their neighborhoods.

“The conversations that are more prominent in my district are conversations about displacement and gentrification and not necessarily the conversation about building wealth through generations,” says De La Rosa. “Most people in our community are heavily rent-burdened and can’t even think beyond their home. They can’t even afford the apartments they live in.”

The rally took place on the same day that Council Member Carlina Rivera introduced it legislation in support of community land trusts. Among those bills was the Community Opportunity to Purchase Act, citywide legislation that warns nonprofits when buildings are being sold and gives them the first opportunity to buy them. Another bill would exempt CLTs from the obligation to advertise on the city’s affordable housing portal, a mandate that has been criticized as costly and burdensome. Due to a 2018 LawUnits that fail to register with the housing site within 18 months are subject to a $2,000 per month fine.

“Local Law 64 introduced a uniform approval process that is expensive, punitive and inconsistent with CLTs,” said Dave Powell, the director of the Cooper Square Mutual Housing Association, in a statement supporting Rivera’s bills.

Last year, the city’s CLTs asked for $1.5 million to add to the fiscal 2022 budget, which they receive. While $3 million would allow the city’s CLTs to significantly increase their headcount, that money would not be allocated for new real estate acquisitions. Proponents hope to increase their demands in future budgets. Councilor Charles Barron, whose district covers East New York, said at Thursday’s rally that the real demand should be $1 billion to chuckle and agree.

“I think we should start with at least $10 million. After we get the $10 million, then the $1 billion. And we can do it because there’s a $104 billion city budget and a $220 billion state budget,” Barron said. “Damn, you can give us a billion dollars.”

Roshan Abraham is Next City’s housing correspondent and a former Equitable Cities grantee. He is based in Queens. Follow him on Twitter at @roshantone.

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Fast-day loan hit by class action lawsuit alleging “Rent-a-Tribe” high-yield lending program https://yeezys.org/fast-day-loan-hit-by-class-action-lawsuit-alleging-rent-a-tribe-high-yield-lending-program/ Wed, 20 Apr 2022 20:15:28 +0000 https://yeezys.org/fast-day-loan-hit-by-class-action-lawsuit-alleging-rent-a-tribe-high-yield-lending-program/ New to ClassAction.org? Read our Newswire Disclaimer Fast Day Loans is facing a proposed class action lawsuit alleging that the payday lender broke Indiana law by making high-interest loans to state residents while purporting to be protected from liability by the sovereign immunity of a Native American tribe to be. The 17-page lawsuit accuses the […]]]>

Fast Day Loans is facing a proposed class action lawsuit alleging that the payday lender broke Indiana law by making high-interest loans to state residents while purporting to be protected from liability by the sovereign immunity of a Native American tribe to be.

The 17-page lawsuit accuses the defendants – WLCC Lending FLD (which does business as Fast Day Loans); Wakpamni Lake Community Corporation; Wakpamni Lake Community Corporation II (operating as WLCC II); and three people – ran a so-called “rent-a-tribe” program.

According to the lawsuit, these types of operations involve a payday lender pretending to be operated by a Native American tribe — in this case, the Oglala Sioux tribe — to take advantage of the group’s tribal immunity. In reality, the lawsuit argues, the lender pays the tribe only a small percentage of its earnings in exchange for using its name, while it is funded and operated entirely by non-tribe members.

The lawsuit alleges that the defendants were not in fact a legitimate “arm of the tribe” and instead acted “against the wishes of the tribal authorities.” The lawsuit alleges that when two of the individual defendants approached the Oglala Sioux Tribe’s Economic Development Bureau with a proposal to enter into a high-yield consumer loan deal, the tribe turned it down. Only after this event did the persons WLCC and WLCC II form the Case Relays.

According to the complaint, because Fast Day Loans’ operations on non-Indigenous land, including in Utah, Texas, Canada and Belize, were conducted by non-Indigenous entities and individuals and did not benefit the Oglala Sioux tribe, the lender is not protected from liability under the sovereign immunity of the tribe.

“When non-Indigenous individuals and entities control and administer the material credit functions, provide the credit capital needed to support the operation, and bear the economic risk associated with the operation, they are not in effect ‘operated’ by Native American tribes and, therefore, are not protected by sovereign immunity ‘ argues the complaint.

The lawsuit alleges that Fast Day Loans nevertheless made loans to Indiana residents at more than 700 percent interest and in violation of the state’s usury laws.

The lawsuit seeks to represent anyone with an address in Indiana who was granted a loan on behalf of Fast Day Loans at more than 36 percent interest on or after the date two years prior to the filing of the lawsuit (April 19, 2022), or on or after a date four years before the filing of the lawsuit.

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Some struggling to pay property taxes turn to high-interest lenders https://yeezys.org/some-struggling-to-pay-property-taxes-turn-to-high-interest-lenders/ Wed, 20 Apr 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://yeezys.org/some-struggling-to-pay-property-taxes-turn-to-high-interest-lenders/ Soaring home valuations released this month have left many homeowners with sticker shock. With some struggling to pay the taxes, 2022 could bring renewal to a contentious industry. Property tax lenders offer desperate homeowners and businesses a way to protect their homes from foreclosure by offering high-interest instant loans. After years of steadily growing, the […]]]>

Soaring home valuations released this month have left many homeowners with sticker shock. With some struggling to pay the taxes, 2022 could bring renewal to a contentious industry.

Property tax lenders offer desperate homeowners and businesses a way to protect their homes from foreclosure by offering high-interest instant loans. After years of steadily growing, the pandemic cut its fate short, but some see the conditions ripe for a comeback.

“After a couple of pretty rough years before, it’s definitely been a good year,” said Andy Cahill, president of Johnson & Starr, an Austin-based property tax lender that serves properties across the state. “I suspect this will be the best year we’ve seen in a long time.”

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Getting the easiest loans https://yeezys.org/getting-the-easiest-loans/ Fri, 15 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://yeezys.org/getting-the-easiest-loans/ You may be approved for some loans, e.g. B. for emergency loans, payday loans, and loans with bad credit or no credit check, even if you don’t have the best credit history or stable income. They can provide you with the funds you need to pay for any expenses that may come your way. But […]]]>

You may be approved for some loans, e.g. B. for emergency loans, payday loans, and loans with bad credit or no credit check, even if you don’t have the best credit history or stable income. They can provide you with the funds you need to pay for any expenses that may come your way.

But just because these loans are easy to get doesn’t mean they’re right for you. Some come with sky-high interest rates and fees that can take a toll on your finances.

The simplest loans and their risks

If you are looking for credit to meet unexpected expenses, consider an emergency loan, payday loan, or bad credit or no credit check loan. While these types of loans are usually easy to obtain, each type carries risks.

emergency loan

An emergency loan is a personal loan used to cover unexpected expenses, such as medical bills or bills for car repairs. Lenders will typically let you borrow $1,000 or more; Some lenders even deposit the money into your account the same day you sign the loan agreement. The interest rate you get on an emergency loan depends on several factors, such as: B. Your credit rating, income and debt-to-income ratio.

Count on interest rates between 5.99 and 35.99 percent. The lower your credit rating, the higher the interest rate. If the lender charges processing fees, you typically pay between 1 and 8 percent of the loan amount.

Risks: If you have poor to excellent credit (670 or higher) and a solid income, your loan can come with high interest rates and fees.

payday loan

Payday loans are short-term loans meant to be repaid by your next payment period or within two weeks of taking out the loan. Since most payday lenders do not check your credit, these loans are easy to get. However, they have serious disadvantages in the form of high interest rates and fees.

In fact, the average interest rate on a 14-day payday loan is more than $300 650 percent in some states. If you are unable to repay the loan by the due date, rollover fees may apply (assuming your state allows payday loan extensions).

Risks: Since these loans come with inflated fees, they are best used as a last resort. If you can’t afford to pay off the loan by the next payment period, you risk digging yourself into a deeper hole financially.

Bad credit or no credit check loans

A bad credit loan is a personal loan for borrowers who have less than excellent credit or minimal credit history. Although minimum credit score requirements vary by lender, you typically need a minimum credit score of 580 to qualify. If you don’t meet the lender’s minimum credit requirements, an alternative is a no-credit check loan. The downside of a no credit check loan is similar to a payday loan – it comes with high APRs and fees.

Risks: If you have really bad credit, you risk high interest rates and fees — some personal loan lenders have maximum interest rates of up to 35.99 percent.

Alternatives to easy loans

If you want to avoid the borrowing costs associated with the loans discussed above, here are some alternatives to consider.

Local banks and credit unions

If you are a member of a local bank or credit union, contact them to see if you qualify for a personal loan. Because you have a relationship with the institution, you can qualify for better rates and terms. For example, PenFed Credit Union offers personal loans with no processing fees and an APR of just 4.99 percent.

Local charities and non-profit organizations

Check with your local chamber of commerce or library or dial 211 to see if there are grants in your area. Depending on your income level, you may qualify for federal or state rent assistance or food assistance programs. If you need help paying rent, you can contact the US Department of Housing and Urban Development Database to search for rental assistance programs in your area.

payment plans

If you can’t afford to pay a phone bill, medical bill, or other bill in full, ask the company if you can set up a payment plan. Although you’ll likely be charged an additional fee or interest, it could cost less than a loan. In addition, you do not have to submit a formal application or undergo a credit check.

salary advances

If you need to pay for an expense immediately but won’t be paid for a week or more, ask your employer for a salary advance. You borrow money from yourself, which prevents you from incurring debt and having to pay interest and fees back to a lender.

Loan or hardship distribution from your 401(k) plan

If you need more money than you could get on a salary advance or your employer doesn’t offer it and you have a 401(k), you should ask about a 401(k) loan or emergency assistance. There is no credit check and you can access the money quickly in most cases.

But you must expect to pay interest on the loan amount even though you are borrowing from yourself. These monies are paid back into your retirement account, but on an after-tax basis.

Borrow money from family or friends

If you want to avoid taking out cheap credit or paying minimal interest, ask a family member or friend to borrow money. This option allows you to bypass the formal loan application process and may have more flexible repayment options. Also, the person lending you money may not charge interest. Get the terms of the loan agreement in writing and pay back the loan as promised so as not to damage your relationship with the lender.

Next Steps

Before you take out an easy loan, make sure you explore all of your loan options. This way you can pay the lowest possible interest or get the best terms. If taking out an emergency loan is your only way to access cash quickly, pre-qualify for a personal loan to compare interest rates, fees, and terms from multiple lenders. If you have a membership with a credit union or bank, contact them to see if you qualify for a personal loan.

frequently asked Questions

How long does it take to get the loan funds?

Every lender is unique. However, many lenders offer quick financing, especially those that operate online. You may be able to get the money via direct deposit within a few business days, 24 hours or even the same day you request it.

Do I need any documents to apply for a loan?

In most cases, you will need to provide some documents to apply for a loan. This may include government-issued identification, such as your driver’s license or passport, which proves your identity, as well as payslips and tax forms showing your financial situation.

What can I do to secure a loan on better terms?

Boost your credit score to get a loan with a low interest rate and favorable terms. You can do this by paying your bills on time, reducing your debt levels, limiting the frequency of applying for new accounts, and contesting errors or inaccuracies in your credit reports.

Learn more:

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